Steve Farzam

Key Roles In A Hotel

It takes hard work to make a hotel feel like a home. That’s why hotels—from luxury resorts to family-owned bed and breakfasts—employ a small army of staff to make guests feel welcome and comfortable. These jobs can be challenging, but at the Shore Hotel, we’re fortunate to have a dedicated team that goes the extra mile to fill our guests’ every need. For anyone who may be considering a career in hospitality or anyone who’s ever wanted to peek behind the curtain of the hospitality industry, take a look at some of the essential roles in a hotel!

Front Office

The front office staff is the face of the hotel. These personnel greet guests, check them in and out, and provide information about the hotel as well as the surrounding areas. They also handle reservations and most of the hotel’s external communication with clients or on clients’ behalf.

Uniformed Services

Roles in a hotel’s uniformed services department consist of bell staff, valets, door-persons, and concierges. The first people most guests meet upon arrival at a hotel are bell-staff, who help to unload baggage from the guest’s vehicle, deliver it to their room, and possibly introduce them to other helpful figures or show them the facilities. Guests may also meet valets, who park guests’ cars and pick them up as necessary, and door-persons, who open doors, greet guests, and help bell staff with luggage.

Additionally, concierges act almost as assistants for guests and have a range of responsibilities that may include helping guests navigate the area, making reservations or handling issues that may arise during their stay, and much more.

Housekeeping

The front office staff may be the face of a hotel, but housekeeping is its backbone. Beyond the obvious duties of cleaning guests’ rooms and the hotel’s other facilities, housekeeping staff also handle laundry needs, provide dry-cleaning for guests, and more. Many hotels also recruit inspectors who supervise and inspect the work of the room attendants; at smaller businesses, this role may be filled by a manager who randomly checks the rooms.

Food and Beverage

Hotels typically include at least a restaurant and bar on their grounds as well as room service, and they may even offer catering services. This means hotels need chefs, bartenders, waiters, dishwashers, and any other kitchen staff to provide guests and patrons with top-quality service and delicious food and drink.

Sales and Marketing

The sales and marketing branch of the hotel handles its promotions and advertising. Through various channels, the hotel works to involve the community and attract new consumers. Most hotels that hire full-time sales and marketing have a more substantial budget for marketing and advertising.

Steve Farzam

How to Make Hotel Guests Feel Welcome

He’s away on business. They’re enjoying a honeymoon in a dream destination or vacationing with the family during a yearly getaway. Maybe she’s just passing through. Regardless of why people are travelling, they trust the hotels where they stay with the important responsibility of making them feel right at home even when home might be thousands of miles away.

At the Shore Hotel, we take this duty very seriously, and as COO, I do everything in my power to make sure that guests have the most enjoyable and welcoming experience possible during their stay with us. Check out some of the secrets on how to make guests feel welcomed that I’ve learned after a long career in the hospitality industry!

A Personal Welcome

First impressions are lasting, so making sure you’re ready to greet your guests as they arrive goes a long way toward making them feel right at home. The personal introduction shows the guests that they’re valued, but beyond that, this is the first opportunity you have to shape their opinion of the hotel. You should be dressed professionally and with a friendly, enthusiastic attitude so you can warmly welcome your guests on behalf of the hotel and make them feel special—and happy with their choice of accommodation—as soon as they step through the doors.

Take Care of Their Needs

If your hotel is going to serve as a guest’s home away from home, then you’ll want to provide them with all of the creature comforts they need. In the bathroom, lay out toiletries like sustainable or eco-friendly soaps, shampoos, toothbrushes and toothpaste, razors, and other sundries. Place fresh flowers so that the room is fragrant by the time they arrive to make them feel at ease. And another nice touch for the modern traveler is offering a complimentary phone charger during their stay!

Touch Base Often

Once the guests have had a chance to settle in, find opportunities to catch up with them and ask how they’re enjoying their time with you. Do they like their room? Is there anything that you can do to make them feel more comfortable? These check-ins let guests know that you’re invested in their happiness and that you actually want them to be as comfortable as possible, which will make them feel right at home.